Monday, August 31, 2015

World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation.

1 September to 4 October is Time for Creation.
The beginning and the end date of Time for Creation are linked with the concern for creation in the Eastern and the Western traditions of Christianity, respectively.
September 1st was proclaimed as  a day of prayer for the environment by the late Ecumenical Patriarch Dimitrios I in 1989. The Orthodox church year starts that day with a commemoration of how God created the world. On 4 October, Roman Catholics and other churches from the Western traditions commemorate Francis of Assisi, known to many as the author of the Canticle of the Creatures.
The proposal to celebrate a Time for Creation during these five weeks was made by the Third European Ecumenical Assembly in Sibiu in 2007.The following year, the WCC Central Committee invited churches to observe Time for Creation through prayers and actions
Pope Francis has designated September 1st as the annual World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation. He hopes this day will be a time for individuals and communities to “reaffirm their personal vocation to be stewards of creation, to thank God for the wonderful handiwork which he has entrusted to our care, and to implore his help for the protection of creation as well as his pardon for the sins committed against the world in which we live.”
To celebrate this auspicious new day in our calendar year, Catholic Earthcare Australia have partnered with the Franciscans (OFMs) to develop a beautiful downloadable prayer resource, featuring a prayer for creation from Laudato si’. We hope that you will find it a useful resource for World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation.
It is our profound conviction that the future of the human family depends also on how we safeguard – both prudently and compassionately, with justice and fairness – the gift of creation that our Creator has entrusted to us. Therefore, we acknowledge in repentance the wrongful mistreatment of our planet, which is tantamount to sin before the eyes of God. We reaffirm our responsibility and obligation to foster a sense of humility and moderation so that all may feel the need to respect creation and to safeguard it with care. Together, we pledge our commitment to raising awareness about the stewardship of creation; we appeal to all people of goodwill to consider ways of living less wastefully and more frugally, manifesting less greed and more generosity for the protection of God’s world and the benefit of His people.
In May 2014 Pope Francis and the Ecumenical Patriarch, Bartholomew I, held private talks in Jerusalem and signed a Common Declaration in which they pledged to continue on the path towards unity between the Catholic and Orthodox Churches. Their encounter marked the 50th anniversary of the historic meeting between Pope Paul VI and the Patriarch Athenagoras in 1964.

Prayers From The Pacific

Saturday, August 29, 2015

World Day of Migrants and Refugees 2015


My introduction to the cultural diversity of Catholicism began in my childhood parish of Ss Peter and Paul's Geelong West. The chapel at St Patrick's Primary School in the parish was the base for the Italian Community.  As a young boy i can remember the intrigue and wonder when we  were given a Chinese priest,Fr Leo Tien  as an assistant. He had come from studies in Rome and led our introduction to the reforms of the Second Vatican Council.

My young adult years with the Capuchin Friars  enriched my understanding of community and nurtured my passion for work among peoples of non-English speaking backgrounds.Since those days I have had opportunities to immerse myself in cross cultural settings that include the Philippines and Papua New Guinea.

Each year in Brisbane I celebrate the World Day of Migrants and Refugees with friends and fellow pilgrims at the annual Migrant and Refugee Mass at the Cathedral of St Stephen. 

The images I have captured from recent  annual Masses tell the story of a Church Without Ethnic Frontiers.
2014
2013
2011
2008

RESOURCES


Thursday, August 27, 2015

Wear It Purple Day 2015


When I was young I liked purple. However my parents and community didn't think it was an appropriate colour so I was not allowed to wear it.

I loved Lent and Advent because the Church was decorated in purple and the priests wore purple vestments. But no-one told me that purple was a colour for celebration. 

So now I wear purple in solidarity with young people who respect diversity and sexuality. I wear purple as an older man to make up for the years I missed out on this experience as a young man.
#WearItPurple ‪#‎ColourYourPerception‬

Australian Catholics For Equality Facebook Page

I have recently accepted an invitation to join the advisory board of Australian Catholics for Equality.

This new role provides guidance to the Council of Moderators on issues affecting LGBTIQ Catholic persons, their family, friends and allies. The Advisory Board provides practical and strategic advice to support the total work of the organising community, improving the lives of LGBTIQ Catholics, their families, friends and allies to promote a just and inclusive church and society.

I look forward to the challenge and the opportunities of this new and exciting project.


3
Tony Robertson, Advisory Board Member
Tony is a Brisbane based social worker, who also uses his skills as a photographer to promote social change and equity in the community. He spent six years with the Capuchin Friars as a young adult and has been involved in various public ministries of the Church as a speaker, educator and retreat leader. Tony is an occasional commentator on LGBTI issues for the ABC and has extensive media experience writing press releases and responding to interview requests. He is currently the Spiritual Life facilitator for the L’Arche community in Brisbane. Tony is a member of the Brisbane LGBTIQ Action Group and supports Gar’ban’djee’lum Network an independent social network for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay men, lesbians, bisexuals, transgender people, sistergirls and brotherboys (GLBTSB) in and around Brisbane.

Friday, August 21, 2015

Sr Veronica Brady 1929-2015 RIP

My life and work in photography has taken me to extraordinary places and put me in contact with inspiring people.

In October 2006 I had the opportunity to take a few shots of Sr Veronica Brady when she was the guest speaker for the Micah Projects Inc Annual General Meeting.See the set here.
In Kath Gordon's biography she is described as the Larrikin Angel. In this image I have captured her with another Catholic larrikin, Peter Kennedy.  Go Petr's right is Karyn Walsh CEO of Micah Projects Inc.
The news of her death in August 2015 has been marked by tributes and acknowledgements from the literary and religious community.

Among my treasures is a copy of her book Caught In The Draught which I will carry around and read again as a reminder of the contribution of this small nun who walked tall on our cultural landscape.
In her own words:
Indeed one of the things I have always loved in Catholicism is its comprehensiveness, the way in which people of all cultures, classes and psychological and moral shapes and sizes can all belong together and get on with one another. But that is also why I am troubled by the growing intolerance as Church authorities attempt to fit us all into one mould made in Rome which takes little account of local or cultural differences and the tendency to condemn any attempt to rethink our faith in terms of contemporary thought and experience. But who possibly can have the last word on God's ways with and in this world?
Examples abound, in the ‘war on terror’, American policy in the Middle East and so
on. But I would like to look at an example closer to home, the relations between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. Essentially there is a clash here of notions of ‘truth’, of conflicting notions of reality and value. But of the two it seems to me that ours is the more intransigent and determined that our ‘truth’, our way of living in the world, must prevail.
Roy Williams Review of Larrikin Angel

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Australian Catholics for Equality

I have recently accepted an invitation to join the advisory board of Australian Catholics for Equality.

This new role provides guidance to the Council of Moderators on issues affecting LGBTIQ Catholic persons, their family, friends and allies. The Advisory Board provides practical and strategic advice to support the total work of the organising community, improving the lives of LGBTIQ Catholics, their families, friends and allies to promote a just and inclusive church and society.

I look forward to the challenge and the opportunities of this new and exciting project.


3
Tony Robertson, Advisory Board Member
Tony is a Brisbane based social worker, who also uses his skills as a photographer to promote social change and equity in the community. He spent six years with the Capuchin Friars as a young adult and has been involved in various public ministries of the Church as a speaker, educator and retreat leader. Tony is an occasional commentator on LGBTI issues for the ABC and has extensive media experience writing press releases and responding to interview requests. He is currently the Spiritual Life facilitator for the L’Arche community in Brisbane. Tony is a member of the Brisbane LGBTIQ Action Group and supports Gar’ban’djee’lum Network an independent social network for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander gay men, lesbians, bisexuals, transgender people, sistergirls and brotherboys (GLBTSB) in and around Brisbane.

Saturday, August 15, 2015

Holding The Man


Holding the Man came a generation after my Catholic schoolboy days but the cultural paradigm was familiar. This is a powerful screen production of one of the great Aussie love stories. I was honoured to attend the Brisbane preview and fundraising event for Queensland AIDS Council.



Throughout the story the Catholic Church as institution and cultural guide struggles with the rich dynamic of human intimacy and young love.Although Tim Kroenet gives the Jesuits a gold star for  being "relatively progressive and inclusive" the shine is tarnished at John's funeral the priest who knows that Tim regards John as his husband dismisses their relationship as mere friendship.
Catholic schoolboy life in the 60s and 70s was cruel and unwelcoming for those of us attracted to our peers. I sat for my HSC  in 1970 and for the six years of my life at St Joseph's College Geelong I had spent much of my break time in the school day with the same group of mates. Of that group three of us were gay but we had neither the language nor community to support each other's journey into sexuality. We went different ways into life's joys,hopes, grief and anguish.

I have my own connections to this love story. At one time I had a job interview at Xavier College and one of the members of the panel was disturbed that I wore odd socks.I wasn't offered the position.
I am proud that my old school is now a participating member of the Safe School Coalition. I have life membership of the Old Collegians and have been invited back as a Gay man to tell my story of a different era and to encourage inclusion and welcome as school and footy oval values.
Come and see this film when it is in your neighbourhood and in these localities.. The acting is passionate, the story is ours. ‪#‎HTMMovie‬
Need a guide to help you unpack the story?  Check out this set of Teacher's Notes

Saturday, August 08, 2015

Vatican picks music by English composer Paul Inwood as official Year of Mercy hymn

06 August 2015 17:40 by Liz Dodd
The Vatican has chosen a composition by English Catholic composer Paul Inwood to be the official setting for the hymn of the Holy Year of Mercy.



Mr Inwood’s setting was judged the best entry in an international competition organised by The Pontifical Council for the Promotion of the New Evangelisation and judged by a committee that included Mgr Massimo Palombella, Director of the Sistine Chapel Choir.

The text of the hymn in Latin and Italian was written by Jesuit Father Eugenio Costa and was sent to the 90 composers March 31, just over two weeks after Pope Francis announced the Year of Mercy would open Dec. 8.
The verses feature lines from Scripture punctuated by the Latin phrase "in aeternum misericordia eius," which means "his mercy is forever."
The interspersed Latin, Inwood wrote in a press release, makes the verses "a kind of litany."
Like the text, he wrote, "my music is also a mixture, with elements in the style of a Taize response and a Gelineau tone," a modern homage to chant often used today when singing the Psalms at Mass and other liturgies.
Inwood said he wrote the English and French words of the song, and the Gelineau tone, which allows for a wide variety of syllables to be sung in every bar, should make it easy to translate the song into other languages as well

Links
Eugenio Costa also recorded a great interview about the significance of Missa Luba, a setting I have loved since first hearing it in the late 60s.